Koksilah River from Kinsol Tressle, looking East

Koksilah River from Kinsol Tressle, looking East

This year’s weather, especially Summer and Fall, have been spectacular at Eaglenest Sanctuary.

 

My partner and I have been taking long walks almost every weekend. The light, the brisk, fresh air and the temperature have made these walks the best experience I’ve had since I moved here almost 12 years ago. For me, these walks not only bring the nurture and healing that nature provides, but it also means I am enhancing my health and preparing for my older age.

 

Though the amount of rain that has fallen on the forest is less than usual, it has been just the right amount to keep the rainforest healthy and vibrant and at the same time provide the most beautiful fall in my memory.

 

The Kocksilah River, looking east with Eaglenest Sanctuary on the left.

The Koksilah River, looking east with Eaglenest Sanctuary on the left.

The picture above, of the Koksilah river looking west, was taken this December, from the middle of the Kinsol tressle. The evening before, the almost full moon was rising while the light from the sun was waning. What a spectacle! Good for the soul, this direct contact with nature.

Eaglenest Sanctuary is located kitty corner with the Kinsol Tressle. I have been visiting the tressle almost every week since 2002. When I first saw it, the crossing had been closed, as it had been burned in the middle a few years before.

I saw it deteriorate substantially in the  following years . You can see a picture of the tressle in 2002, a few years before the renovation. It was difficult to understand how the CVRD had completely abandoned such an important part of Vancouver Island’s History. The Kinsol Tressle is the largest one of its kind in the Commonwealth. One feature that is usually overlooked when experts talk about it is the fact that it is built in a curve, an unusual feature for most tressles.

Fortunately, the authorities saw the light and decided to restore it to its pristine condition – as when it was first built in the beginning of the 20th century. You can see how it looks now, after the two year renovation project. The CVRD should be commended in their effort to preserve the engineering history of Vancouver Island. To show for their efforts, the tressle is now considered one of the main attractions the Cowichan Valley has to offer. Let’s hope the authorities continue to develop this very important tourist and historic attraction.

Have a perfect Solstice and season holidays and may 2014 finally bring in “The Golden Age Of Gaia”.

Ezio Cusi

 

 

Kinsol Tressle in 2002

Kinsol Tressle in 2002

Kinsol Tressle in 2013

Kinsol Tressle in 2013

 

 

 

Posted in: News.
Last Modified: December 22, 2013

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